Author Archives: Carrie Prewitt

Cousins

What a beautiful afternoon for a photoshoot with a good friend and her family. These are some seriously beautiful kiddos.

girl-standing-in-woodslittle-boy-sitting-in-woodsgirl-sitting-in-woods-Jackson-TN

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“Little Briar Rose” from “East of the Sun and West of the Moon”

“Little Briar Rose”

AKA Sleeping Beauty. This was one of the first illustrations I did for this project. Sophie, my beautiful model, was so wonderful. She had to lie down at the top of these steps near downtown Jackson, while all the people in passing cars were wondering what the heck we were doing! People keep asking me where this picture was taken and when I say downtown Jackson they are so surprised! I wonder why? Haven’t they noticed the lush gardens that grow at this spot? LOL.

Anyway, like Cinderella, there are many, many versions of this story. And, like Cinderella, the original tale of Briar Rose is very different from the Disney-fied version we all know and love. I did not illustrate the original story because it is extremely dark, involving adultery, rape, and cannibalism. Surprising, isn’t it? If you are interested in reading the original Charles Perrault story in translation, you can find it here. I chose to stick to the more known variation by the Brothers Grimm.

My 12×12 book, “East of the Sun and West of the Moon”, which contains the entire exhibition including the beautiful accompanying story pages, is available for purchase online here in hardcover and softcover.

 If you would like to view the entire exhibit in person, you can visit  The Bank of Jackson on Oil Well Road, second floor, until May 31.

This image is the last in the series! I hope you have enjoyed the stories!

Sleeping-Beauty-Girl-Flowers-steps

quote-Sleeping-Beauty

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“The Little Match Girl” from “East of the Sun and West of the Moon”

“The Little Match Girl”

This image was one of the audience favorites at the art show opening.  The beautiful child pictured here is Sadie, whom I have photographed since she was a baby. My, has she grown!

This story has long fascinated me, even though it is most certainly a dark story. When I was little I had a book containing this story, and I can still remember the illustration of the little match lighting up the entire street. I interpreted the story differently, but hope I did Hans Christian Andersen’s wonderful moral story justice. The quote I used, although very sad, is definitely not the tragic part of this tale.  If you have ever read the story you know that in the end the little match girl goes on to her heavenly reward, comforted by her grandmother’s spirit. But I was not so macabre as to illustrate that part!

In this image, I love the way Sadie is looking through the door. I think she was in reality a little apprehensive because it was dark in my studio! I also love the way the shadows were on the wall behind her.  I was very proud of the way this one turned out!

My 12×12 book, “East of the Sun and West of the Moon”, which contains the entire exhibition including the beautiful accompanying story pages, is available for purchase online here in hardcover and softcover.

 If you would like to view the entire exhibit in person, you can visit  The Bank of Jackson on Oil Well Road, second floor, until May 31.

Little girl with match by window, Jackson TN children's photographer

Quote from "The Little Match Girl"

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Kayelee and Dylan

I just love these kids. They are so exuberant! Kayelee was SO cute and funny, and I just love her curls. Dylan has grown up so much since I saw him last! He is starting to look like such a little boy! We had a great day for our session! After a chilly start to the day, the weather warmed up just enough.

a girl running, antique picture, Carrie Prewitt Photographybrother and sister sitting in the woods, portrait, Jackson, TNLaughing girl with bow, Jackson TN children's photographerlittle boy sitting by a tree, Jackson TN children's photographylittle boy, pensive portrait, Carrie Prewitt Photography

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“Cinderella” from “East of the Sun and West of the Moon”

“Cinderella”

The version of Cinderella most people are familiar with is the Disney-esque version involving singing bluebirds, blue dresses and blonde hair, glass slippers and fairy godmothers. Well, the version I have always loved the most is the one I decided to illustrate, by the brothers Grimm. The Grimm version, is, well, grim. Which is why Walt Disney did not choose to base his animated tale on that version.

It is well-known that Walt Disney almost always changed fairy tales and other stories to suit his vision. And all in all, there are 345 known versions of the Cinderella story floating around in the world. So there were plenty of stories from which to pick and choose! But I would imagine that the main reason Disney did not animate the Grimm’s version of Cinderella was that it included the chopping off of feet. Pretty sure that would have gotten Disney some bad press. Plus, how do you write a song about that?

Here are some of the ways the Disney version is different from the Grimm version:

  • Disney took more of his inspiration from the Charles Perrault version of the fairy tale than he did from the Brothers Grimm. The Grimm version seems far more in line with an Alfred Hitchcock tale than it ever would with the tales of Disney.
  • In Disney’s version, the slippers are made of glass. Pure Disney – there are no glass slippers in any other version of the tale. In the Grimm fairytale they were made of gold.
  • In Disney’s version, the King holds a ball to introduce the Prince to all the single women in the land in an effort to get him engaged. In the Grimm fairy tale, it’s a three day festival and the Prince is given three chances to find Cinderella (or Ashpet, as she is called in some variations). He manages to narrow his search down to one household. Oh, and in Grimm’s tale, she didn’t just lose her slipper – the Prince had the stairs of the palace coated in pitch after she escapes him twice and that’s how he gets his hands on the golden slipper.
  • In the Disney version, it’s the Duke who tries the slipper on everyone. When he arrives at Cinderella’s house she has to escape from her room to get to him and when the shoe is shattered, she stuns everyone by producing the matching slipper. In Grimm’s version, the step-sisters cut off parts of their feet in order to fit into the slipper, but the blood on the shoe betrays the women and when Cinderella tries it on, the shoe fits fine.
  • In Disney’s version, Cinderella and her Prince marry and live happily ever after. They marry in the Grimm’s version too – only in the Grimm Fairytale, the step-sisters have their eyes pecked out at the wedding. Cool, right?
The scene I chose to illustrate is one of the most poignant scenes in the story, in which Cinderella prays at the tree planted over her mother’s grave, and waits for her bird friends to appear. My beautiful model here was Jada, who braved a bitterly cold day to pose for me!

My 12×12 book, “East of the Sun and West of the Moon”, which contains the entire exhibition including the beautiful accompanying story pages, is available for purchase online here in hardcover and softcover.

 If you would like to view the entire exhibit in person, you can visit  The Bank of Jackson on Oil Well Road, second floor, until May 31.

Girl looking at bird in tree, picture, Carrie Prewitt Photography

 

Quote from Cinderella Story, Brothers Grimm

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